Games and Gender

People have always told me that gaming is something almost only boys do. But according to forskning.no this is wrong. Forskning.no is writing that a British survey showed us that forty-four persent of the gamers between sixteen and twenty-four years are girls, and fifty-six persent are boys. I know many girls who play video games, but I thought it was much more common to boys. That is wrong, and from my point of view this is largely because of the prejudices and expectations the community that we live in. Playing video games is not a typical girls-thing, and it has never been. I think some girls who usually play games do not want to tell other about their gaming habits. They may fell that people will judge them because they are girls.

I am positive that almost everybody does some sort of gaming, both girls and boys. But the game genre is different. According to vg.no, “Fifa”, “Minecraft” and “Call of duty” are some of the most popular games for boys. Games like “Sims”, “Go Supermodel”, “Sing Star” and “Cash King Islands” are more common to girls. What I have understood by talking to other students is that girls like when games are about interior, clothes and makeup. Many girls I know also like games if you actually have to think a little bit while gaming. When it comes to boys, the impression I have is that they like better when it is action. The most popular video games to boys are very often war and violence related. There are also some games that are popular to both boys and girls. Games like “Hay Day”, “Flappy Bird”, “Tetris”, “Candy Crush” and so on, are examples of games that appeal to both genders. From my point of view, these games are all games without any plot or story. Games without any plot or story have bigger general appeal because most of the persons who play the games do it to make the time to fly past faster.

Some girls play videogames like this, but there are not many.

I can see a big difference between the different people in my class when we are gaming “Civilization 4” at school. A few students have played it before, but it is new to most of us. The people who have played it before are both girls and boys. The boys are much more positive to this way of learning than many of the girls. They are more willing to work at this at home, and many of them also are really trying to understand the point. At the same time, a big part of the girls are surprisingly positive and into “Civilization”.

I am not one hundred present sure why our teachers chose to play “Civilization” with us. This is because I can not understand everything in the game myself, and then it is harder to learn something. But at the same time, I am positive that I can learn something by playing this game. When I learn more how things are working, I will understand more while gaming, and I also think I will learn more.

There are some differences when it comes to strategy when girls play civilization and when boys play civilization. In class I have seen that girls more often want to go in for good economy, science or wonders. What I have understood by talking to other pupils is that boys want to focus on war, weapons and violence. This is also something you can see by looking at boys and girls playing in the real world. In my opinion there is a big connection between the real world and how boys and girls play Civilization IV.

Bibliography:

Dahl, I. “Ny undersøkelse: Så mye dataspill spiller unge gutter” http://www.vg.no/forbruker/teknologi/data-og-nett/ny-undersoekelse-saa-mye-dataspill-spiller-unge-gutter/a/10146286/ (downloaded: 11.04.14)

Grønli, K. “Nye damer i spillverden” http://www.forskning.no/artikler/2009/mars/215374 (downloaded: 11.04.14)

Written by Ragnhild – 1STA

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One thought on “Games and Gender

  1. You make an interesting observation in regards to the different preferences of men and women when it comes to what type of games, or play style, they prefer to play. Do you feel that this difference is caused by nature or by nurture? In other words are men and women born with this difference or is this difference caused by the way in which both genders are treated, and viewed, by society?

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